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Our lab group studies the physical movement of organic carbon in the ocean. We specialize in situ imaging and optical proxies from autonomous platforms. 

15 cm

These images, collected during EXPORTS show  the types of particles and microscopic organisms important for transport of organic carbon

in the ocean

twilight zone.

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100 m below surface

Particles become sparser at depth as they are grazed by deep-living zooplankton and fish, and colonized by oceanic microbes. 

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At depth, large aggregate particles disapear and radiolarians become more prominent.

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150 m below surface
200 m below surface
330 m below surface

contact:

___________________________
Watkins Lab Rm 220

Graduate School of Oceanography
University of Rhode Island
South Ferry Road
Narragansett, RI 02882
email: momand@uri.edu